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WHO AM I?

I’m Byron Christopher, a Canadian reporter with more than three decades’ experience in the mainstream [commercial] media.

I’ve also worked for the [so-called] independent media.

And now I have my own blog, part of the new phenomenon called ‘social media.’ Sorry to toss all those labels at you.


THE IMPORTANCE OF JOURNALISM

Journalism plays an important role in a democracy. I realize that’s stating the obvious but if people are to make informed choices — the hallmark of a true democracy — they’ll need information that’s fair and balanced … and information that can be verified.

An uncensored flow of information is the very heart of a free country.

Our job is to make sense of what’s happening in the world. Life being what it is, that’s easier said than done.

When we read newspapers, watch TV or listen to the radio, it’s impossible to know how much is actual news, what’s opinion, what’s manufactured — or if we’re getting propaganda or corporate public relations. Or, if management has ordered reporters to do stories for political reasons. There are far too many “ifs” are at play here.

Joseph Jankowski sums it up pretty nicely, in reference to a survey that shows a mere 6 percent of Americans trust the mainstream and corporate media, “Most Americans,” he says, “are aware of the staggering dishonesty and reality twisting, that the mainstream, corporate news media engages in on a daily basis.”

You’ve heard of reporters being “embedded” with the military. Think of mainstream/corporate journalism as reporters embedded with the status quo. They know where their bread is buttered.

Most grocery products have labels indicating what consumers are getting. But with news content, we will never see the following, for example …

Fact: 30% … Speculation: 40% … Influence by sales staff trying to woo a client: 20% … Censorship: 10% … etc.

The public is at the mercy of news organizations — and news organizations can have their own agendas, just as reporters can have their own agendas. That’s why it’s difficult to find news that’s truly independent and trustworthy. Trust is like an eraser. It gets smaller and smaller after every mistake.

A mistrust of news organizations runs beneath their reports like a bass note. No one knows who to believe anymore and what to believe. As an old lawyer friend put it, “Never mind the laugh channel … just watch the news.”

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Hunter Thompson … 1937-2005

Hunter Thompson once remarked, “I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone but they’ve always worked for me.”

Another thing to keep in mind: In North America, the major news organizations are in the hands of very few companies. In Canada, the heads of the very big news companies are there only because they’ve passed the right test — a DNA test [as in “daddy owns the company”]. The people of New Brunswick know this only too well.


WATCH DOGS AND LAP DOGS

Do you really think a military that hands out junkets to reporters wants those journalists to do an independent job? Fat chance. Why do you suppose most news organizations fail to mention its staff is on a paid junket? There are two reasons for this: 1] it destroys credibility … and 2] when a reporter is on the take, it’s slightly embarrassing. Journalism isn’t stenography.

As the subtitle of my blog suggests, news release journalism has never appealed to me.

Thanks to Gary Larson and crew.

Thanks to Gary Larson.

I’ve always been drawn to the ideals of journalism. In my view, that’s far more important than news releases or drive-by reporting.

Some of the best files I’ve worked on have been the result of digging for original material — often on my own time.


PLAGIARISM

Just to let you in on a dirty secret in the news business, plagiarism is rampant in radio and television newsrooms … and now, the Internet. We’ve heard a lot about identity theft. This is information theft.

Sorry to come across as iconoclastic, but let’s face it, it takes money to gather news — and it’s cheaper to steal. Like the world of entertainment, much of the news business is “smoke and mirrors.” That’s how a radio newsroom with a staff of two can come up with the same stories as a newspaper with a staff of 50.

Why don’t newsrooms always give credit for stories that are done by others? Because it would be an acknowledgment that someone beat them to the story.

In the end, shareholders and senior media managers with their eyes on performance bonuses are treated far better than a public that longs for meaningful information.


CREDIBILITY

Surveys indicate that journalism is one of the least trusted professions. There are a number of reasons for this. One is that few news organizations abide by a Code of Ethics. As the joke goes, what’s the difference between a brothel and a newsroom? One has a code of ethics.

The credibility of journalists is further eroded when reporters accept military junkets or raise money for police. When journalists aren’t independent, their credibility goes out the window.

While some people believe that journalism committed suicide a long time ago, I”m one who feels there are many good reporters out there who are not only doing their best but making a difference. They oppose plagiarism, they don’t accept junkets … and they stand up to management who attempt to censor or influence news content. Good for them.


MANUFACTURED NEWS AND ADVERTISING

Frank Niertit, Director of Chemical Instrumentation at the University of Southern California, writes, “We cannot be everywhere. That is why we need reporters. Journalists should be our probes and sensors into the tissue and history of our existence. Unfortunately, those probes and sensors are systematically being dismantled — and contrived information is being presented to us.”


BE YOUR OWN EDITOR

Why not? I ask that all ‘news consumers’ weigh the information they’re getting and judge for themselves the value of that information. Hey, be your own editor. Think for yourself.

Should you discover anything on my blog that’s lifted from a news release or stolen from another source, I’ll contribute $1,000 towards a hit man to put me out of my misery. But enough of the bravado. Enjoy the site … and if you feel some information is worth passing on to others, please do. With credit of course.


THINGS END. MEMORIES DON’T.

One more thing … some entries on this blog appear like ‘trips down memory lane.’ That’s because they are, to a large extent. But, of course, they’re more than that, as I often write about “the story behind the story.” My hope is to give readers an insight into specific news events and into the profession I love.

These posts are also therapeutic because I have all these stories “bouncing around in my head” and I need to get ’em out.


NO DONATIONS OR ADVERTISING PLEASE

This site does NOT depend on funding from anyone. You’ll see no requests for donations.

Also, I receive zero money for this site from government or corporations. They’re not my masters. No editors, senior editors, executive editors, sponsors or shareholders are tapping me on the shoulder. It’s kinda nice, actually.

You can find out more about my reporting career by visiting: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byron_Christopher

Thanks

“The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country. We are governed, our minds are molded, our tastes formed, our ideas suggested, largely by men we have never heard of. In almost every act of our daily lives, whether in the sphere of politics or business, in our social conduct or our ethical thinking, we are dominated by the relatively small number of persons … who understand the mental processes and social patterns of the masses. It is they who pull the wires which control the public mind.” – Edward Bernays [Public Relations Consultant] – 1928

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COMMENTS???

Comments to posts on this site are welcomed. Before a comment can be posted, however, I try to validate the email address by responding with an email of my own. If that comes back as ‘undeliverable,’ the comment isn’t posted.


TWO WAYS TO REACH THE AUTHOR: 

BY ELECTRONIC MAIL:  click here

BY PHONE: 780.716.4693 [Cell]

9 thoughts on “About the Author … and how to contact him.

  1. Hello Mr. Christopher,

    Thank you for your talk in this morning’s Criminal Law class. I am sad to hear that my beloved CBC may not be the pillar of integrity I thought it was, but I guess it’s good to know these things. I agree that we must be critical and thoughtful hearers of the news. I tend to get lazy in my thinking. Thank you for the shake.

    Like

  2. Thank you for having the courage to stand up to the mainstream media.

    Many people are blind to the goings on in the media. If a student in high school, college or university can be expelled for plagiarism, then why can’t people at private radio stations or any other news organization be made an example of. The answer to that is that management expects it, it is a prerequisite of the job these days to be a sleazebag with no ethics.

    Unfortunately, the dirty tactics of the media — plagiarism, sensationalism, nepotism, and being in bed with government, industry and the police — have left the public with McDonalds for information instead of a home-cooked meal. These people make actors and directors in the porn industry blush. I hope people sue these dirtbags for publishing false information and ruining lives.

    Like

  3. Hello Mr. Christopher. I am from Miramichi, New Brunswick … formerly known as Newcastle. I was wondering if I might be able to have a few minutes of your time to hear any or more stories you might be able to tell me about my father. You knew him as Cst. Ambury Newman from the Newcastle Police. I read the article where you had mentioned him ‘spinning vinyl.’

    I hope to possibly hear from you. Thanks for your time!

    Like

  4. My Mother, Audrey Ferguson, is the same age as Doctor Helen Houston. Doctor Helen visited Mom and Dad from time to time at our farm near Ripley, Ontario when she was home from Nepal — and at least once after she retired.

    Mom lost Helen’s address after she and Dad moved into Kincardine. Mom would love to reconnect with Helen.

    My father, Lester Ferguson, died in 2009. My Grandparents, John and Helen MacMurchy from Ripley Ontario, were friends with Will and Edith Houston [Helen’s parents — Editor]

    I remember as a child it was so exciting getting news of Doctor Helen’s work in Nepal.

    Like

  5. Hey old man. Hope all is well with you. Just came across this site. Good to see you still plugging away and putting your own honesty into stories.

    It was always a pleasure to chat with you about news on those lonely weekends many years ago.

    Good luck and stay healthy.

    Like

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